Competitive Sports in Schools

The primary school National Curriculum will be published in draft this autumn and is set to replace more broad based physical activities such as Indian dance with traditional competitive sports.

The Prime Minister has declined to restore funding for school sport partnerships, which linked state pupils with professional coaches, defending the decision to scrap the targets he said: “I see it with my own children ... because you know, the two hours that is laid down is often met through sort of Indian dancing classes. Now, I’ve got nothing against Indian dancing classes but that’s not really sport."

Not to be outdone The Mayor of London, who went to Eton, said he wanted children to have the sort of compulsory sports regime he had at school with 2 hours a day of sport.

Does this latest move to revise school sport strategy set up false conflict between competitive sport and physical exercise?  Dance is a fantastic way of keeping fit and getting a full cardiovascular workout, so given the context of growing levels of childhood obesity, should it be part of a portfolio of activities offered to give children more choice?

Let us know what you think and how you will be working to increase participation amongst children in your local area.

RE: Competitive Sports in Schools

I believe having competition in schools is as important as the actual education as a whole. it gives children goals, aims and even personal bests to beat. An 'everybody wins' attitude mentally does no good for the children as this mentally gives them false accusations, they believe they are winning when in actual fact they are not, making them over confident and are not all they make out to be. A competitive attitude prepares the children for adulthood giving them good life skills and characteristics such as integrity, compassion and trust.
Anonymous 08/01/2013 16:49